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Archive for the ‘Regular Features’ Category

The Questions…

1. What is the smallest planet in the solar system?

2. The four carvings on Mt. Rushmore depict Presidents Washington, Jefferson, Lincoln, and Teddy Roosevelt. Why those four?

3. “Koala bear” is an inaccurate term because the animal isn’t a bear. What is a koala?

4. Milk is a source of calcium and protein, and cow’s milk is the most widely-consumed milk in North America. But another kind of milk is more popular in the rest of the world. What is it?

5. Lego bricks, the plastic construction toys, were created in 1932 by Ole Christiansen, a Danish carpenter. In 2015, Lego was named the “world’s most powerful brand.” Over 600 billion Lego bricks have been manufactured. What is the origin of the word “Lego”?

The Answers…

1. It depends. Of the eight big-league planets, Mercury is the smallest, being about 38 percent the size of Earth. Pluto was the smallest until it was demoted to “dwarf planet.” Of the five dwarf planets we officially recognize these days, the smallest is Ceres at 600 miles in diameter.

2. Gutzon Borglum, the monument’s creator, said Washington represented the birth of the nation, Jefferson the growth, Lincoln the preservation, and Roosevelt the development.

3. The koala is a marsupial. Specifically, an arboreal herbivorous marsupial whose closest relative is the wombat.

4. Goat’s milk.

5. Lego comes from the Danish phrase leg godt, which means “play well.”

Mercury et al

Legos

 

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Dinosaur

Pro-now

Shoot people

My state

 

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Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity.

— Seneca the Younger

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There is no charm equal to tenderness of heart.

— Jane Austen

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I have steadily endeavoured to keep my mind free so as to give up any hypothesis, however much beloved (and I cannot resist forming one on every subject) as soon as facts are shown to be opposed to it.

— Charles Darwin

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People speak sometimes about the “bestial” cruelty of man, but that is terribly unjust and offensive to beasts. No animal could ever be so cruel as a man, so artfully, so artistically cruel.

Fyodor Dostoyevsky

« Portrait de Sénèque d'après l'antique » (le Pseudo-Sénèque), b

Seneca

Dostoyevsky F

Dostoyevsky

 

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This Just In

BEAVERTON, OREGON — Four officers and two police dogs responded to a 911 call about an intruder in the bathroom of a Beaverton residence.

The call came from two men who were house-sitting for a nephew. When the officers arrived, they saw a moving shadow under the bathroom door and heard erratic noises inside.

They identified themselves as police, but got no response from the intruder. They warned that police dogs were present, again with no response.

After a 20-minute standoff, the officers burst into the bathroom with guns drawn. Inside was a Roomba vacuum cleaner stuck in a corner and banging periodically against the shower door.

Roomba

LINCOLN, NEBRASKA — Police officers responding to a report of domestic assault took a male occupant of the residence into custody for resisting arrest, obstructing a government operation, false reporting, child neglect, and third degree domestic assault.

The officers knew in advance that one of the residents, 26-year-old Markel Towner, had two open arrest warrants. They found a man matching Towner’s description seated in a parked vehicle. The man identified himself as “Deangelo Towns.”

When the officers placed the man under arrest, he protested that he had done nothing wrong and began to struggle with the officers. Several family members also appeared and tried to interfere, but the man was handcuffed and taken to the city jail.

The police report noted that the subject wore a lanyard around his neck with the name “Markel Towner” on it.

Lanyard

HAINES CITY, FLORIDA — A 68-year-old local man faces DUI charges after he crashed his riding lawnmower into a police car.

The incident happened while the police car was parked in front of a convenience store. The officer heard a crash, ran outside to investigate, and observed a dented bumper on the police car. Next to the vehicle was the subject seated on a riding mower. Connected to the mower was a trailer with a large cooler inside.

The man failed a field sobriety test, and a subsequent blood test revealed the presence of cocaine, which the man accused the police of putting there against his will. He also accused the officers of poisoning him and was taken to a hospital to be examined.

Police said the man has two previous DUI convictions, and his driver’s license has been suspended since 1978, which explains why he needed a riding mower.

Riding mower

 

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(Note: I chose “We Will Rock You” as a Tune o’ the Day because I heard a toddler belting it out in the Jefferson Kroger recently. That kid, he rocked.)

After a concert in 1977, guitarist Brian May of Queen wondered what audiences can do in confined spaces to express themselves. He concluded “They can clap their hands, they can stomp their feet, and they can sing.”

May decided Queen needed a song, something simple and catchy and rousing, that would cause audiences to get involved.

He said he woke up the next morning with the idea for “We Will Rock You” in his head, including the famous STOMP-STOMP-CLAP beat.

The song’s lyrics are a “three ages of man” story. In the first stanza, a boy on the streets dreams of a better life. In the second stanza, as a young man, he still struggles to make something of himself. In the third, he is a defeated old man whose life went nowhere.

(I tried to figure out what the energetic “we will rock you” chorus has to do with the three verses, but I gave up.)

Queen recorded the song in an empty London church because the band liked the acoustics. May said he found some old boards under the stairs that “just seemed ideal to stomp on.”

The stomping was done separately in a studio as the band, the staff, and the recording engineers all joined in to create and record the distinctive STOMP-STOMP-CLAP. No actual drums were used.

Creating a classic rock anthem is a lot of work.

Queen

We Will Rock You

By Queen, 1977
Written by Brian May

Buddy, you’re a boy,
Make a big noise,
Playing in the street,
Gonna be a big man someday.

You got mud on your face, You big disgrace,
Kickin’ your can all over the place, singin’

We will, we will rock you.
We will, we will rock you.

Buddy, you’re a young man,
Hard man,
Shouting in the street,
Gonna take on the world someday.

You got blood on your face, you big disgrace,
Waving your banner all over the place.

We will, we will rock you.
Sing it!
We will, we will rock you.

Buddy, you’re an old man,
Poor man,
Pleading with your eyes,
Gonna make you some peace someday.

You got mud on your face, big disgrace,
Somebody better put you back into your place.

We will, we will rock you.
Sing it!
We will, we will rock you.
Everybody!
We will, we will rock you.
Hmm
We will, we will rock you.

Alright.

 

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Meteor

Follow

Hate

Testing

 

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The Questions…

1. Who invented leotards?

2. In 1477, Archduke Maximilian of Austria gave his bride-to-be a unique gift that became all the rage among aristocrats. The tradition lives on today, even among common folk. What was it?

3. A desert is a region that gets 10 inches or less of precipitation per year. What is the world’s largest desert?

4. In 1888, Theophilus Van Kannel of Philadelphia invented and patented what became the revolving door. However, he envisioned it as something else. How did he describe it in his patent application?

5. What are ninja? More correctly, what were ninja?

The Answers…

1. French acrobat Jules Léotard (1838-1870), who also originated the flying trapeze routine. The one-piece leotard he wore was designed for agility — and to show off his physique to impress the ladies.

2. A diamond engagement ring.

3. The continent of Antarctica, which is classified as a polar desert. It covers 5.5 million square miles. The 2nd-largest desert is the Sahara in Africa, 3.5 million square miles.

4. As a storm door.

5. Ninja were covert agents who served Japanese territorial lords in feudal Japan. Trained to have a particular set of skills, they were sent on missions to scout, spy, sabotage, and assassinate. The samurai, the class of Japanese military officers, considered the ninja to be dishonorable. Ninjas live on today as covert government agents of the James Bond variety.

Leotard

Ninja

 

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